Prevent Infections in Health Care Facilites

Preventing infections in health care facilities has always been a top concern of health care providers and professionals.

Health care-associated infections (HAIs) continue to plague facilities in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that one out of every 20 patients will become infected with an HAI.

Among the most prevalent infections are Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) and the Norovirus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issues guidelines for preventions of these infections. Sanitation and sanitizer play a heavy roll in the prevention of these infections.

CDC’s Six Steps to C. difficile Prevention:

  1. Prescribe and use antibiotics carefully. About 50 percent of all antibiotics given are not needed, unnecessarily raising the risk of C. difficile infections.
  2. Test for C. difficile when patients have diarrhea while on antibiotics or within several months of taking them.
  3. Isolate patients with C. difficile immediately.
  4. Wear gloves and gowns when treating patients with C. difficile, even during short visits. Hand sanitizer does not kill C. difficile, and hand washing may not be sufficient.
  5. Clean room surfaces with an approved, spore-killing disinfectant after a patient with C. difficile has been treated there.
  6. When a patient transfers, notify the new facility if the patient has a C. difficile infection.

CDC Norovirus Prevention Tips:

  1. Patients with suspected norovirus may be placed in private rooms or share rooms with other patients with the same infection.
  2. Follow hand-hygiene guidelines and carefully wash hands with soap and water after contact with patients with norovirus infection.
  3. Use gowns and gloves when in contact with or caring for patients who are symptomatic with norovirus.
  4. Routinely clean and disinfect high-touch patient surfaces and equipment with an EPA-approved product with a label claim for norovirus.
  5. Increase the frequency of cleaning and disinfection of patient care areas and frequently touched surfaces during outbreaks of norovirus gastroenteritis (e.g., increase ward/unit level cleaning twice daily to maintain cleanliness, with frequently touched surfaces cleaned and disinfected three times daily using EPA-approved products for health care settings).
  6. Frequently touched surfaces include—but are not limited to—commodes, toilets, faucets, hand/bed railing, telephones, door handles, computer equipment, and kitchen preparation surfaces.
  7. Remove and wash contaminated clothing or linens.
  8. Exclude health care workers who have symptoms consistent with norovirus from work.

RJ Schinner can supply you with disinfection and sanitizers – as well as gloves – to help in the prevention of these infections.

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